Notes on Kite Aerial Photography: Photo Gallery

Bolinas Ridge Road #2
Marin County, California



A view of Stinson Beach and Bolinas from 300 feet above Bolinas Ridge (17K jpg, Canon 24-mm, January 1997).

go to location mapThis page continues my Sunday afternoon images from Bolinas Ridge, 2,000 feet above the adjacent Pacific Ocean. In this view, taken near sunset, you can see the long, twin strand of Stinson Beach highlighted in the sun glint. In the print, and to a lesser extent in the attached jpg, you can see the shadows of individual trees on the beach. Hang gliders launch themselves from the road where I took these photographs to land way down on the beach below. Bolinas occupies the point beyond the beach and Duxbury reef stretches into the Pacific at its tip. The water stretching inland toward the right was not visible from my flying position. This is the Bolinas Lagoon, a scenic and fecund estuary.




From meadow to forest to the Pacific Ocean (29K jpg left and 40K jpg right, T4 Super, January 1997).


Both of these images have the lens flare common to the Yashica T4 when it is pointing toward the sun. I think it is sort of nice in these shots and I am particularly fond of the one on the right. The scene includes an almost tangible light toward the beach and deep shadows in the foreground ravine. The Coastal Trail, a path for humans as opposed to deer, winds along the treeline. I've never hiked it but now I want to. There is delightful detail in the print.



Hillscapes (47K jpg left and 45K jpg right, T4 Super, January 1997).


On the left is an aerial view across the rounded ridgelets that spring perpendicularly from the main ridgeline. Tectonic collision pushed these ridges up, erosion and slides are wearing them down. On the right the camera is looking northeast across the ridgeline. You can see Alpine Lake nestled in the shadows of the trees.



Bicyclists on Bolinas Ridge Road (54K jpg left and 55K jpg right, T4 Super, January 1997).


The Bolinas ridge is popular with bicyclists and it is easy to see why. You can leave San Francisco via bike, cross the Golden Gate Bridge, and climb Mt. Tamalpais to the ridgeline. Your reward is a stunning view and a trip back that is largely downhill. The image to the left has a remarkable texture to it. The road and bicyclists lend it scale. In the attached jpg you can see a fine grain of paths through the steeply-sloped grass hill. One larger path used by humans parallels the roadway. The remaining paths are made by animals and form a fine tracery across the grass.



A ridgeline knoll -- my flying site (55K jpg, Canon 24-mm, January 1997).


As the sun was setting I took a shot of myself flying from the knoll. I'm in the dead center of the image. This was a particularly pleasant outing.




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